Normal School

nprfreshair:

Awesome display in a public library showing why these classics were once banned.

Keep reading, y’all.

via BoingBoing

nprfreshair:

Awesome display in a public library showing why these classics were once banned.

Keep reading, y’all.

via BoingBoing

killer-kerry:

digitalhoarder:

ceyren:

A Wooden Train Set That Lets Kids Compose Tune

To a kid, making music can seem very mysterious, but the fundamental love of playing around with different sounds and listening to how they sound when strung fluidly together is something every musician and composer discovers first in childhood. “I wanted a toy that allowed children to discover for themselves how music was actually made.”

IT’S CALLED “SOUND TRACK”

def getting this for my kids

(via the-library-kat)

wincherella:

carlboygenius:

Lost Traditions

This

wincherella:

carlboygenius:

Lost Traditions

This

Why Are the Majority of Children's Books Still About White Boys?

In the most comprehensive study of children’s literature during a period of 100 years, researchers recently found that:

  • 57% of children’s books published each year have male protagonists, versus 31% female.
  • In popular children’s books featuring animated animals, 100% of them have male characters, but only 33% have female characters.
  • The average number of books featuring male characters in the title of the book is 36.5% versus 17.5% for female characters.

It’s not just the quantity, but the quality as well. Female characters, as in movies, are often marginalized, stereotyped, or one-dimensional. For example, in Peter Pan, Wendy is a stick-in-the-mud mother figure, and Tiger Lily is a jealous exotic. The animated books featuring animals are particularly subtle. Think about Winnie the Pooh—Kanga is the only female character, and she’s definitely not one of the gang.

The researchers concluded, “The gender inequalities we found may be particularly powerful because they are reinforced by patterns of male-dominated characters in many other aspects of children’s media, including cartoons, G-rated films, video games, and even coloring books.”

But, it goes beyond gender and is true of racial and ethnic diversity as well. The Cooperative Children’s Book Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Education has conducted a survey of all kids and young adult books published each year since 1985. Of an estimated 5,000 children’s and YA books released in 2012, only 3.3% featured African-Americans; 2.1% featured Asian-Americans or Pacific Islanders; 1.5% featured Latinos; and only 0.6% featured Native Americans.

(Source: sparkamovement, via realkidsgoodbooks)

tellmeoflegends:

optimysticals:

vageena33:

My Queen.

I do love Dolly.

Here in Tennessee, Dolly has an organisation called The Imagination Library. It donates books that she chooses every month to EVERY CHILD born in Tennessee from the day they’re born until they turn five. TWELVE BOOKS A YEAR FOR FIVE YEARS EVERY CHILD! Thank you, Dolly Parton!

^This is pretty great.

(Source: weskit, via goodstuffhappenedtoday)

A lot of marriages don’t survive raising a gender-creative son who is, statistically speaking, most likely going to be gay or transgender as an adult. I wish I could to talk to those men. I wish I could be there for their kids.

[…]

To me, loving a child who is different, a target and seen as vulnerable is my role as a father and decent human being.

[…]

My wife also gets a load of emails from people asking where our son’s father is, as though I couldn’t possibly be around and still allow a male son to display female behavior. To those people I say, I’m right here fathering my son. I want to love him, not change him.

—   

Beautiful, important essay by Matt Duron, a former policeman and firefighter, on raising a “gender-creative” child. (Bonus points for coining the heartening term.)

Pair with this soul-shaker on the subject. 

(via explore-blog)

(Source: , via explore-blog)

“We raise our little boys to view their bodies as tools to master their environments. We raise our little girls to view their bodies as projects to constantly be improved.”

black-nails-and-t-cells:

lielocks:

a friendly reminder: COLLEGE IS NOT FOR EVERYONE
- people who went/go to college are not ‘better’ or ‘smarter’ than anyone else
- there is no right time to pursue ‘higher education’
- no matter what, you are still a person and you deserve to be treated with respect

image

(Source: 100cherries, via queen-of-ok-deactivated20140126)

41 Transgender-friendly Books for Young Kids | Bitch Media

(Source: damnitdisney)